Our website uses cookies to enhance your browsing experience and to collect information about how you use this site to improve our service to you. By not accepting cookies some elements of the site, such as video, will not work. Please visit our Cookie Policy page for more information on how we use cookies.

News & Events

Tánaiste and Minister Donohoe welcome latest figures showing record levels of employment

The Q2 2022 Labour Force Survey and latest Monthly Unemployment Release show:

  • Employment continues to grow strongly. 205,500 jobs were created in the year to Q2 2022
  • 48,800 of these jobs were created in Q2 2022
  • Total employment now stands at 2,554,600 million, in excess of the 2.5 million target set in the Economic Recovery Plan for 2024
  • All regions register job growth- employment outside of Dublin increased by 148,600 in the year to Q2 2022 (+ 9 percent)
  • Full time employment up 137,900 (+7 percent) year on year in the second quarter

Labour Force Survey (LFS) results published today by the Central Statistics Office show a continued recovery from the pandemic in Ireland’s labour market, with 205,500 jobs created in the year to Q2 2022. There was an increase in employment of 48,800 in the second quarter of this year. Employment now stands at 2.55 million, an increase of approximately 9 percent over Q2 2021.

The increase in employment in Q2 2022 maintains the strong momentum in job creation that began in early 2021. This is reflective of the success of the Government’s efforts to help workers and businesses during the pandemic, the successful rollout of the vaccination programme and the focus of driving a labour market recovery set out in the Economic Recovery Plan.

Commenting on the figures, Tánaiste and Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment, Leo Varadkar TD, said:

“More people are employed in Ireland now than ever before. The unemployment rate in July of this year was the lowest it’s been in 21 years. That is incredible given where we were a couple of years ago, with the pandemic and Brexit, and the current challenges we are now facing with Putin’s war and inflation. It is a testament to the hard work and remarkable resilience of Irish enterprise.

“We set out to create the right environment, the right help, to support job creation in every county in the country, so that no matter where anyone wants to work, there’s a job for them in their nearest city, town or village. So, I’m particularly pleased to see that jobs have grown in all parts of the country, with a significant increase outside of Dublin.

“The bounce back in the hospitality sector is another highlight. Although not yet back to where it once was, employment in the Accommodation and Food Service sector increased by 40% in the past 12 months. The last two years have been especially challenging for businesses and workers in that sector, but it appears our strong policy interventions during the pandemic – effectively keeping workers attached to employment - has minimised any long-term scaring.

“I know these results don’t tell the lived experience for all businesses and that some are still really struggling, especially with increased costs, and we will continue to help, with our existing schemes, but also by introducing new measures in the upcoming Budget to help with what will be a difficult Winter ahead.

“As we approach full employment too, the Government is mindful of the need to help businesses recruit talent with the right skills. We continue to provide thousands of additional re-skilling and upskilling opportunities, as set out in the Economic Recovery Plan, while my Department operates an employment permit system which is highly responsive to areas of identified skills needs and labour shortages across the economy.”

The Minister for Finance, Paschal Donohoe TD, said:

“Today’s data show the continued recovery in the labour market, consistent with the income tax data that we have seen over the summer months. The total number of people at work is now at a new record high of 2.55 million and quarterly unemployment has fallen to its lowest rate since 2005.

Encouragingly, the recovery is being led by strong participation from both youth and female workers, with more opportunities than ever opening to persons wanting to contribute to Ireland’s economy.

Looking ahead, indicators suggest a moderation of economic activity and this could slow the pace of employment growth in the second half of the year and into next year. My Department will publish an updated analysis and detailed forecasts in the coming weeks as part of Budget 2023.”

 Please also find here a link to the result themselves: Labour Force Survey Quarter 2 2022 - CSO - Central Statistics Office